Writing equations in Jeklly

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Writing \(\LaTeX\) on Jeklly is not hard, but it can be tricky. After some light surfing on the internet, I found what works for me.

Use MathJax for Jekyll

  • insert the code in the _layouts/default.html
<script type="text/x-mathjax-config">
MathJax.Hub.Config({
  tex2jax: {
    inlineMath: [['$','$'], ['\\(','\\)']],
    processEscapes: true
  }
});
</script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/mathjax/2.7.0/MathJax.js?config=TeX-AMS-MML_HTMLorMML" type="text/javascript"></script>
/* Some pointless Javascript */
var rawr = ["r", "a", "w", "r"];

Note in the last line, a cdn or content delivery network line was used to invoke interpretation of the \(\LaTeX\) style writing, and eventually convert it to figure.

Use LaTex to write equations

I found LaTex/Mathematics is wildly used to write equations on the website, such as rmarkdown.

For example, use $$mean = \frac{\displaystyle\sum_{i=1}^{n} x_{i}}{n}$$ to write

\[mean = \frac{\displaystyle\sum_{i=1}^{n} x_{i}}{n}\]

Use $$k_{n+1} = n^2 + k_n^2 - k_{n-1}$$ to write

\[k_{n+1} = n^2 + k_n^2 - k_{n-1}\]

Reference

  1. http://blog.lostinmyterminal.com/webpages/2015/01/09/math-support-in-jekyll.html
  2. https://zjuwhw.github.io/2017/06/04/MathJax.html
  3. https://docs.mathjax.org/en/latest/tex.html

2021-08-08 update

Apparently, mathjax v3 is now available :link: link. To use it, simply change:

<script type="text/x-mathjax-config">
MathJax.Hub.Config({
  tex2jax: {
    inlineMath: [['$','$'], ['\\(','\\)']],
    processEscapes: true
  }
});
</script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/mathjax/2.7.0/MathJax.js?config=TeX-AMS-MML_HTMLorMML" type="text/javascript"></script>

to:

<script type="text/javascript">
window.MathJax = {
  tex: {
    inlineMath: [['$', '$'], ['\\(', '\\)']],
    processEscapes: true
  }
};
</script>
<script src="https://polyfill.io/v3/polyfill.min.js?features=es6"></script>
<script id="MathJax-script" async src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/mathjax@3/es5/tex-mml-chtml.js"></script>

However, I find the new version doesn’t automatically render horizontal scroll bar for long equations.


2021-08-09 update

$\KaTeX$, as an alternative to MathJax, can render equations with HTML format and it’s much faster. Following :link: this blog post, I was able to add it to my blog.

To use $\KaTeX$, add the following to _config.yml:

kramdown:
  math_engine: katex

Then add the following to the end of _include/head.html:

<!--KaTeX-->
<link rel="stylesheet" href="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/katex@0.13.13/dist/katex.min.css" integrity="sha384-RZU/ijkSsFbcmivfdRBQDtwuwVqK7GMOw6IMvKyeWL2K5UAlyp6WonmB8m7Jd0Hn" crossorigin="anonymous">
<script defer src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/katex@0.13.13/dist/katex.min.js" integrity="sha384-pK1WpvzWVBQiP0/GjnvRxV4mOb0oxFuyRxJlk6vVw146n3egcN5C925NCP7a7BY8" crossorigin="anonymous"></script>
<script defer src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/katex@0.13.13/dist/contrib/auto-render.min.js" integrity="sha384-vZTG03m+2yp6N6BNi5iM4rW4oIwk5DfcNdFfxkk9ZWpDriOkXX8voJBFrAO7MpVl" crossorigin="anonymous"></script>
<script>
    document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function() {
        renderMathInElement(document.body, {
          // customised options
          // • auto-render specific keys, e.g.:
          delimiters: [
              {left: '$$', right: '$$', display: true},
              {left: '$', right: '$', display: false},
              {left: '\\(', right: '\\)', display: false},
              {left: '\\[', right: '\\]', display: true}
          ],
          // • rendering keys, e.g.:
          throwOnError : false
        });
    });
</script>

and put the following to css/main.scss file to add scroll bar to long equations:

.katex-display > .katex {
  display: inline-block;
  white-space: nowrap;
  max-width: 100%;
  overflow-x: scroll;
  overflow-y: visible;
  text-align: initial;
}

Note that inorder to use $jekyll serve$ on local machines, extra package called kramdown-math-katex is needed. To install it:

gem install kramdown-math-katex --user-install


Author | Chengcheng Xiao

Currently a PhD student at Imperial College London. Predicting electron behaviour since 2016.